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Kit'n'Kaboodle

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Reply with quote  #1 

This D.520 was my entry into last November’s Flory Models forum weekend turkey shoot, and ever since I finished it, it has bugged me.  Each time I look in my display cabinet it sticks out like a sore thumb.  My paint job was, shall we say, not the best, and the decals were bloody awful, being silvered and not conforming one bit to the panel lines.

 

  20181125_154440.jpg  20181125_230115.jpg 

 

So last week I decided to do something about it.  Something radical.  I would strip the whole kit back to bare plastic and do it all again.

The basics are covered on the Flory site but it involves using neat IPA to take the paint off, and strip the kit back to plastic.

Note of caution.  Use your least favourite brush for this, because you will ruin it.  So, pour some IPA into a convenient container, have a fresh roll of kitchen towel to hand, and start by rubbing the kit with the brush in small circles.  Best to do one small area at a time, because the IPA evaporates fairly quickly.


20190122_191819.jpg   

The decals themselves needed something a bit stronger, so I used Tamia X20A to soften them, then very gently slid a scalpel underneath them to lift them off.

 
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Keep wiping the area you are working on with kitchen towel, to prevent the softened paint from re-drying.

 
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It’s a slow, laborious job, and you will make an unholy mess!

 
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Once you have gone over the whole kit, and removed the bulk of the paint, rub it down thoroughly with kitchen towel dampened with IPA to remove any residue.  Then wipe it down again with more towel, this time with fresh water.

Hark at me, I actually sound like I know what I’m talking about!

 
20190124_133810.jpg 

Now we have a naked kit!

Since I have more time than I did during the turkey shoot I took the opportunity to add some rivet detail.

 
20190125_184329.jpg 

Now to start again.  I liked how I got the chipping effect on my Raiden, so I thought I’d repeat the technique, but tone it down a bit.  This isn’t a Japanese aircraft after all.

So, primer first, followed by Vallejo aluminium, then a coat of klear over the areas to be chipped.  I guess this is very similar to the hairspray technique?

 
20190125_191109.jpg 

Pre-shading next.

 
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Now the complicated bit, the camo.  According to research, the RAF had standardised camo patterns, which meant, mostly, aircraft were painted to a universal standard.  Not so the French.  Colour layouts were left to the individual units, often to the individual painters, meaning no two aircraft were entirely the same.

Now, the easy thing about the RAF is that most patterns were two colours.  The French used three.  There’s no way in heck I can keep three colours in my head, so I needed a guide.  I tried a pencil first, but it didn’t show up, so I cut some masking tape into very thin strips, then curled them into my own interpretation of a French painter’s scheme!  Note, they are only there as a guide for the following white-tac sausages, and so don’t need to be perfectly flat or curved.  I also marked each section, so I knew which colour was going to go where.

 

 
20190127_111434.jpg 

So here’s the plan of attack.  Roll up some white-tac sausages, chose which colour to do first, and place them to the OUT-side of the guide line.  Then remove the guide line and colour marker.

 

 
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Then mask up the rest.  I started by trying to carefully tailor each bit of towel to each covered area, but quickly got both bored and frustrated with that, so settled on cutting random squares, and putting them down like a sort of mosaic, or patchwork quilt.  This one stage, from rolling the white-tac to ready for paint took the best part of two hours alone!

 
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First colour down.  Two more to go.  Why do the French have to have such complex camo schemes?  Who was that numbskull who keeps banging on about the lack of French bombers again?!

 
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Unmasked, ad this is more-or-less what I wanted to achieve, the pre-shading still intact.  The first time I painted the whole kit in the first colour, then masked off the second, then the third colour, meaning by the third one the pre-shading was totally lost.

 
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Next colour, and this time the white-tac goes to the IN-side of where the guide line was.  Most important here to make sure the brown is clearly seen all around, to ensure a small overlap.  Failure to do so would mean patches of primer between each colour.

 

  20190127_144436.jpg 

Masked again.  I was getting quicker by this stage, only about an hour.  The kitchen towel sticks to the tac after a fashion, but I helped it with little snibblets of tape.

 
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Two down, one to go.  I was also trying my hand at post-shading, or bleaching.  Unfortunately, I think I got too great a contrast between the base colours and the shade.  Too much white.  Also I was not accurate enough with the airbrush, meaning I was not always in the centre of the panels.  Not so much Phil Flory as Mr Blobby.  Still, it’s another lesson in the school of life, I’ll just have to practise more.

 
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Once more into the breach, dear friends!

 
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Final colour laid down.  I did some light chipping, picking at the gun bay access panels and a few other places with a cocktail stick, and rubbing the wing leading edges and fuselage sides with a damp paintbrush.  One feature of the design of the D.520 is that the cockpit is well behind the wing trailing edge.  To me, this means that the wing root would not get nearly so much wear as the pilot entered and exited the plane as other fighters, so I left this alone.

 

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A coat of Klear, ready for decalling. 

 
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Reply with quote  #2 

I’m using PT decals, number PT4802.  Hopefully they’ll be better than the Berma ones I used first time around.

 
20190128_091625.jpg 

Though glossy, they are remarkably thin, and the print is crisp and in register.

 
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I’m doing the top left scheme, an aircraft of GCIII/6, since that’s pretty much the same unit I did last time, so I don’t have to make a new placard for my display cabinet!

 

20190128_091654.jpg   

And these decals are bloody good!  They needed mere seconds in the water, before being ready to slide into place.  Almost at once the panel lines began to show, and it took only a couple of applications of Micro-sol to bed them down.  I did crack two, but that was almost certainly my own fault for being a bit rough with them.  I wholeheartedly endorse PT Decals!

 

20190128_141137.jpg  20190128_141156.jpg   

For the first layer of weathering I used Flory brown wash for the underneath, and dark dirt for the topside.


20190128_183935.jpg 

 

Once wiped off I gave everything a coat of matt varnish, and laid on some Abtielung 502 oils for grease and oil stains from engine and control bearings.  I tried airbrushing the gun streaks, but made a balls-up, so went back to using Prisma-colour pencils.  Some Flory dark earth pigment was used in the wheel wells, and running back from the undercarriage area, to simulate mud and dirt thrown up from the wheels.  A little more was placed around the gun bay doors and just underneath the cockpit.

 

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Another coat of W&N UV matt varnish sealed it in.

 

  20190129_132256.jpg 

 



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Reply with quote  #3 

So, I reattached the landing gear, the antenna mast and the other little bits and bobs, then took these two pics, thinking that’s it, job done.  Then I realised that, a. I hadn’t made the nav light lenses with Micro-crystal clear, and b. the pitot probe seemed to have vanished.  I must have knocked it off at some point, but where it is now I have no idea.  No biggie, I just made a new one out of some Slaters plastic rod.  And now she really is finished.

Reveal shots to follow in the morning.

20190129_161857.jpg  20190129_161914.jpg 



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vdbo76

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Reply with quote  #4 
Great step by step guide, thank you for sharing. And the result is beautiful.
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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vdbo76
Great step by step guide, thank you for sharing. And the result is beautiful.


Thank you, and glad if you find it useful at some point.

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