Genessis-Models

Genessis Models Survey

 

 

Genessis-Models
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Kit'n'Kaboodle

Avatar / Picture

Squadron Leader
Registered:
Posts: 1,012
Reply with quote  #1 

1/48 Tamiya Mitsubishi J2M3 Raiden ‘Jack’

 

I haven’t seen too many Japanese kits in the build or final reveal categories, so I thought I’d have a bash at this kit next.  I have read much about Tamiya’s fine reputation for fit, but I am wondering about this particular subject, as it is quite an old mold, somewhere around 1973 I believe, so this could be an interesting comparison between old and new.

  20181219_094529.jpg 

Aftermarket updates will be a resin cockpit set from Aries.  Oh, the fun I had with the Aries kit for the Dewoitine!  Maybe this one will be better.

  20181219_094626.jpg 

Also a canopy masking set from P-mask, this time for the Tamiya!  I made certain of the right one this time!

  20181219_095406.jpg 

On opening the box I discovered all the sprues, including the canopy, stuffed into just one plastic bag.  This is a common criticism of Airfix kits, but not one I have heard levelled at Tamiya before.

20181219_094640.jpg 

There are three main runners, molded in light grey, plus one runner for the clear parts.  Panel lines are a mix of raised and recessed, and compare well to reference photos, but there is only a limited amount of rivet detail.  However, having watched a tutorial on re-riveting, I may be more adventurous with the rivet wheel on this kit.  There are also a few sink-marks in the area of the locating pins to take care of.  Incidentally, that little fan-shaped thing on the bottom runner is all the engine detail you will get.  On the other hand, the actual plane had such a tightly cowled engine, with very little opening at the front, you would see precious little of the motor itself anyway.

  20181219_094839.jpg  20181219_094905.jpg  20181219_094816.jpg 

The canopy itself is beautifully clear, as shown by the gradient marks on my cutting mat.  Unfortunately, it is cast in one piece, meaning there is no option to display it in the open position.

  20181219_094930.jpg 

The dreaded Tamiya decals!  I’ll give them a try as, unlike during the turkey shoot, I have more time to dedicate to getting them to settle down, but if they present any problems I’ll hunt out some aftermarket ones.

  20181219_095037.jpg 

There is a very nice glossy paper colour print included in the box.  I am seriously tempted to get a cheap picture frame for it.  It wouldn’t look right in the lounge, but maybe half way up the stairs?  I’ll think on that.

  20181219_095203.jpg 

I did panic at first when I pulled out the instruction leaflet, as it was all in Japanese.  Fortunately, there was an identical one tucked underneath in English.

  20181219_095223.jpg 

Instructions themselves are extremely simple, with only a handful of steps.  Assembly should be pretty straightforward, he says, touching wood!

  20181219_095243.jpg 

As with all things in life, proper preparation is key.  So, clear the decks, gather all reference shots and have everything to hand.

  20181221_120026.jpg 

As I mentioned, this is an older mold, so there is a bit of flash and burring to take care of.

  20181221_120054.jpg 

Now comes the re-riveting.  I don’t know if anyone else uses this technique, but it struck me as an idea while I was studying the blueprint itself.  Works pretty well, too.  Open the downloaded plans in Windows, zoom in till the scale matches the actual kit, then hang the parts off the top, not the screen.

  20181221_133059.jpg 

Doesn’t show too well in the pics, but this was the first side completed.

  20181221_142013.jpg 

At first I found it a bit tedious, but after a while I got into my stride, and, surprisingly, began to enjoy it.  I started looking for other places to rivet, like the wheel well doors.  Even the canopy wasn’t spared!

  20181221_160809.jpg 

On the kit, the wingtip nav lights are nothing more than scribed lines.  I decided to carefully cut them out, with the intention of making something out of Micro-crystal clear.

  20181221_204620.jpg  20181221_205305.jpgThat box behind the cockpit is meant to be some sort of radio.  Apart from being blander than margarine soup it’s also too small.  Reference photos show a much larger piece of equipment there.  I’ll scratch-build something out of left-over resin plugs.

20181221_205318.jpg 



__________________
[GMh06IOh] 
0
golfermd

Senior Aircraftman
Registered:
Posts: 43
Reply with quote  #2 
It will be interesting to follow this one. Looks like some kit-bashing and scratch building will be fun...

Dan
0
Kit'n'Kaboodle

Avatar / Picture

Squadron Leader
Registered:
Posts: 1,012
Reply with quote  #3 

It occurred to me while masking up the canopy just how big it actually is.  It’s huge!  Way bigger than any of the other 1/48 kits I have done so far.  Vision in the real thing must have been excellent!

  20181222_174822.jpg 

The Aries resin parts are beautifully crafted, but I noticed the headrest frame lightening holes didn’t go all the way through.  I took care of this with a micro-drill.

  20181222_181726.jpg 

I primed all the resin components with Vallejo acrylic primer, then, for some reason, don’t ask me why, I thought I’d have a go at pre-shading the cockpit sections.

  20181222_200112.jpg 

Most reference shots I have show Japanese cockpits as being painted a somewhat darker shade of green than their allied opposite numbers, so I mixed up some Vallejo interior green with a touch of black till I got what looked about the correct shade.  I think the pre-shading sort of works, though no one is ever really going to notice.

  20181222_201452.jpg 

Now comes the fun part, the detail painting.  Citadel paints, in various hues were used.  The p.e. instrument panel, unlike most cockpits so far, was also interior green, rather than the usual black.  Unless I have done all the previous ones incorrectly?  I then highlighted each gauge by dipping a cocktail stick into the Citadel paint then slowly poking the stick through each hole in the panel and giving it a very tiny twist, to leave an even ring of paint behind.  Because the paint dries so quickly I had to wipe the stick and re-dip it between each hole.  I have to admit, I’m really pleased with the result.

The kit included a clear printed acetate film for the gauges, which I backed with a carefully cut piece of glossy white paper from some redundant instruction sheet.  I attached this to it, and the resultant acetate/paper piece to the panel with Pritt-Stick. The panel was completed with some little dabs of Micro-crystal-clear to give them that glassy effect.  The rest of the cockpit was given some chipping with a silver Prisma-Colour pencil.

The rest of the resin fiddly-arsed bits followed, like the control column, the p.e. throttle levers and some other levers that I have no idea what they did in the real Raiden.  (I have worked in the aviation industry most of my life, and couldn’t even make a guess!)

  20181223_192300.jpg 

Next I began assembling the cockpit tub.

  20181223_192638.jpg 

20181223_193424.jpg 

Dry fitting showed that, as expected, the Aries cockpit didn’t exactly fit, though to be fair it was a lot better than the one for the D.520.  Some course filing on the sides of the tub reduced the gap to a more manageable level.

  20181224_094221.jpg 

I used C.A. glue to fill the gap.  The advantage of doing this is that it doesn’t shrink back as it dries.  The disadvantage is that it is physically much harder than the surrounding plastic, so great care must be taken when sanding, to prevent removing too much of the surrounding land.

20181226_164332.jpg 

 

 

 



__________________
[GMh06IOh] 
0
Kit'n'Kaboodle

Avatar / Picture

Squadron Leader
Registered:
Posts: 1,012
Reply with quote  #4 

What is it with Tamiya and gun ports?  The D.520 was just the same, with ugly, mis-shapen gaps that look nothing like real ports.  And I have to fit cannon barrels into two of them.

  20181227_111548.jpg 

20181227_112231.jpg 

 

The radio antenna mast comes with ‘representations’ of structural lightening holes.  I opened them up with a micro-drill.

  20181227_145516.jpg  
20181227_145918.jpg 

Outside of the cockpit area, Japanese aircraft used a corrosion inhibiting coating called Aotake.  Vallejo have this in their Japanese Air range, and it needs to be applied over an aluminium base.  When I applied it, however, it looked to garish, prompting me to do some research, leading me to this fascinating article.

http://colesaircraft.blogspot.com/2014/01/japanese-wwii-aircraft-aotake-primer.html

Seems Vallejo had it right, and I didn’t even notice I have two different shades of it in my rack!

  20181227_161822.jpg 

Though reference photos show a radio behind the pilot, there are no really clear detail shots of what one actually looks like.  Since I had no idea what a Japanese WWII era radio looks like myself I had to wing it, and scratch-built something from my imagination, using bits of resin plug and plastic sheet.  Painted Citadel black, with some red and white buttons and highlighted with a silver Prisma-colour pencil.

  20181227_162914.jpg 
20181227_162938.jpg 

So now we get to the much-trumpeted Tamiya fit quality.  It’s not so good on this kit, though, to be fair, it is an older kit.  The wing-to-fuselage underside is terrible.

  20181227_193128.jpg 

20181228_212043.jpg 

And despite my best efforts with shims, there was still a step at the upper wing root that would take some serious filling and blending.

  20181228_212059.jpg 

I packed part of the gap with some Slaters plastic strip, to reduce the amount of filler needed.

  20181228_213239.jpg 

Much filling, sanding and re-scribing later it looks a bit better, though the finish isn’t perfect.

  20181230_123518.jpg 

Radio c.a. glued into place with some lead wire wiring to enhance the look.

  20181230_140456.jpg 

20181230_140514.jpg 

Hopefully now ready for primer.

 

 

 

 



__________________
[GMh06IOh] 
0
Kit'n'Kaboodle

Avatar / Picture

Squadron Leader
Registered:
Posts: 1,012
Reply with quote  #5 

Last piece of pre-paint assembly was to attach the canopy.  This filled me with trepidation, because firstly it was a single piece, meaning if there were any fingerprints or dust inside, once it was down there was no correcting it.  But more than that, because the fit was again bad, I couldn’t use Micro-crystal clear, as I usually do, as it would take too long to set while I applied finger pressure to close the gap.  I had to use extra-thin, and just hope that it doesn’t screw things up.  The remaining gaps I filled with Vallejo putty.

  20181231_113454.jpg 

So, I had just wiped everything down, cleaned up the area and mixed the primer when I realised I had forgotten the tail-wheel.  And then, when I removed it from the runner, I discovered an ejector pin hole!  A clear case of less haste, more speed!

  20181230_160726.jpg 

This is the plan.  Most people have seen photos of Japanese aircraft where the paint is peeling off all over the place.  So I first laid down the primer, then covered the whole plane with Vallejo aluminium, followed by a good coating of Klear.  This I followed with the pre-shading.  The idea is that once the top coat is applied, and before it sets too hard, I will pick at the paint with a cocktail stick, scratching away the camo to reveal the aluminium beneath.  Hopefully the Klear will prevent me from going too deep and hitting the plastic, provided I don’t push too hard.

  20181231_162134.jpg 

The underside and upper surface, showing the pre-shading.

  20181231_195741.jpg  20181231_195759.jpg 

 

I had just started the scraping when I realised I had forgotten the yellow leading edges!  No biggie, I just masked up and painted them, then went back to the scratching.  From what I have seen in reference shots, the peeling is most pronounced at the edges and corners of panel lines.  This makes sense, as there is an edge for the weather and climate to get under.  This, then, was where I concentrated my efforts, in an attempt to replicate this process.

  20181231_211123.jpg 

20181231_211131.jpg 

 

To hit the leading edges, I used an old, very worn washing up scourer, with light pressure. 

  20181231_211140.jpg  20181231_211148.jpg  20181231_211159.jpg 

 

 

I finished off just before bedtime with another coat of Klear, ready for decaling in the morning.

Then realised I had also forgotten the black anti-glare panel on the top of the front fuselage!  Buggah!

 



__________________
[GMh06IOh] 
0
Kit'n'Kaboodle

Avatar / Picture

Squadron Leader
Registered:
Posts: 1,012
Reply with quote  #6 

So, yesterday morning I had planned to do the decalling, but the decals had other ideas.  I'm sure I'm not the first to have problems with Tamiya decals.  The first one just would not come off the backing paper, even after several minutes.  I gave it a gentle nudge and the damn thing split.  I left the second one a good ten minutes in the water and eventually it slid off, but both of them refused to settle, just shrugging off the Mr Mark setter and softener.  this is a total replay of the D.520 from earlier.
Can’t deny I’m proper cheesed off about it, because otherwise I would almost certainly have finished the kit in time to take it to tonight’s IPMS meet.  To that end I have ordered the following aftermarket set from Revi, though it’ll probably be the end of the week before they arrive. ☹

https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/REV48002

Don’t know what they’re like, but they can’t be any worse than the Tamia crap.

So, rather than sit on my duff I did a little bit to keep the ball rolling.

As I mentioned, I had forgotten the black anti-dazzle panel before I glossed it all.  So I masked it off, repeated the whole aluminium, Klear and Vallejo black process, then did the scratching again.

  20190101_111859.jpg 

With nothing much left to do on the main body until the decals arrive, I did some weathering on the drop tank, using Flory dark dirt wash, and AK interactive fuel stains.

  20190102_110128.jpg 

Next I painted and assembled the undercarriage.  Legs were done with Vallejo aluminium, wheels were rubber black and the insides of the doors were that green atoke, same as the radio compartment.  I still don’t really like that colour!

I added some fuse wire brake line, then dabbed some pigment over the lot.

  20190102_134845.jpg 

And that’s it, I’m stuffed till the decals arrive.  I’m not really the sort to have two or more kits on the go at once, partly because I just don’t have a big enough studio or workbench, but mainly because once I’m ‘in the zone’ with a kit I find it hard to mentally disengage from it to start thinking about another.  Still, this weekend should see it cracked off.

 



__________________
[GMh06IOh] 
0
Kit'n'Kaboodle

Avatar / Picture

Squadron Leader
Registered:
Posts: 1,012
Reply with quote  #7 
Okay, the aftermarket decals have arrived, the Revi ‘Schragemusik’ set. Don’t know much about them, but they look to be good quality, quite thin and with minimal carrier film. A small number of stencils is also included.

20190105_185212.jpg 

I’m not certain about the historical context regards the Schragemusik fitting to the Raiden; as far as I can find out they only built a couple, but engine problems meant they failed to see combat, whereas the leaflet describes the subject as having shot down one B-29 before being shot down itself, with the loss of the pilot. No matter, I’ll do it as the leaflet describes. Of more use is that there are enough for several other builds, including a Yokosuka D4Y. I just happen to have one in my stash, so it’ll be interesting to do that kit as a night-fighter, with the cannon poking out of the rear cockpit. The colour scheme includes a yellow band round the rear fuselage, something that would have been better applied at an earlier stage, but I masked it up and sprayed Vallejo insignia white followed by RLM yellow. Unfortunately, the tape pulled some of the green off, but then it does look like just another bit of faded and peeling paint, just like the rest of the plane, so I’ll leave it. Decals applied. They’re no Cartograf, but they’re a sight better than the Tamiya crap. They needed ages to soak in the warm water before sliding off the carrier paper, and also took a lot of Mr Softener before settling down, but as I went to bed they looked reasonable enough.

20190105_233430.jpg 

Next morning, after being left to their own devices all night, the decals actually looked a lot better than when I left them. Revi just moved up a notch in my estimation. Not the easiest to work with, but pretty good results in the end. I scalpelled the panel lines, gave one last hit with the Mr Softener, then left it for half an hour. Then I carefully scratched through the decals to the aluminium paint underneath, to match the rest of the surface weathering.

20190106_101250.jpg 

Another Klear coat, in preparation for the rest of the weathering.


__________________
[GMh06IOh] 
0
Kit'n'Kaboodle

Avatar / Picture

Squadron Leader
Registered:
Posts: 1,012
Reply with quote  #8 

A good coating of Flory grime first, to sink into the panel lines.  Then I actually airbrushed the gunsmoke streaks! Getting adventurous in my old age!

  20190106_170858.jpg  20190106_170907.jpg 

I then gave it a coat of Winsor & Newton flat UV varnish, before hitting it again with the Flory grime.  I like this method, as the grime can really grip to the matt coat, giving a good, weathered finish.  Some Abtielung 502 oils for some grease streaks followed.

  20190106_170921.jpg 

For some reason known only to Tamiya, the exhaust stacks were molded as part of the fuselage sides, making painting, and particularly pigmenting, damn difficult.

  20190106_185350.jpg 

Some Flory light earth pigment to show the pilots footprints on top, and dirt and mud thrown up by the wheels underneath.

  20190106_190223.jpg 

Then came the big reveal, removing the canopy mask.

And it’s a disaster.  Filler and grinding dust has found its way inside, sticking to the inside of the canopy.  This must have happened when I was filing the antenna mount, as it was sitting proud of the canopy.

  20190106_210350.jpg  20190106_211048.jpg 

As of right now I have no idea how to fix this, because I had to use extra thin to attach the canopy, given the slightly poor fit.  Trying to remove it will probably end up damaging if not totally wrecking the canopy.

Right now I am proper cheesed off.



__________________
[GMh06IOh] 
0
Kit'n'Kaboodle

Avatar / Picture

Squadron Leader
Registered:
Posts: 1,012
Reply with quote  #9 

I managed to salvage the situation after taking advice from the Flory forum.  Cheers guys!  I needed to get some water to the interior, in order to rinse the offending much and debris away, so to do that I looked for suitable, unobtrusive places to drill some small holes.  The back of the engine cowling was one such place, as the opening is so small, and the prop spinner so large, there is no chance the holes will be seen.  In fact you have to ask how the real plane kept it’s donk cool with so little air flow.

20190107_041508.jpg   

Another place I drilled a hole, more for drainage than anything, is the drop tank locating socket.  Once this is fitted the hole will be covered up.

  20190107_041702.jpg 

The result is that most of that junk has gone.  One or two tiny stubborn specks remain, along with a few water droplets, but hopefully they should dry out with no drama.  Back to the final assembly.

20190107_092659.jpg 



__________________
[GMh06IOh] 
0
Kit'n'Kaboodle

Avatar / Picture

Squadron Leader
Registered:
Posts: 1,012
Reply with quote  #10 

Brief moment of panic when I got back to the kit after breakfast, in that, once the room had warmed up, the canopy fogged up.  Hopefully this will disperse in time.

Wheel wells sprinkled with Flory light earth, then the undercarriage main legs fitted, followed by the drop tank.

  20190107_111522.jpg 

I painted the 20mm cannon with Mr Metal burnt iron, then glued them in with c.a. glue, as the socket was just a little too big.  This is the plastic tube I used to do away with the ugly holes the kit provided, but extra thin was having trouble fixing them in place before they drooped.

Pitot tube is glued in normally, and the nav lights are carefully applied Micro-crystal clear.  Once dry they will be painted with Vallejo transparent red and green.

  20190107_114113.jpg 

Radio antenna wire is Mig Ammo fine rigging.  This stuff is nicely elastic, so won’t snap if you accidentally jog it.

  20190107_124451.jpg 

And we’ll call this one done!

  20190107_191919.jpg 

Oh, and I decided I would frame that piece of artwork.  £1.99 for two frames from The Range, and it looks really nice on the landing, next to the studio door.

  20190107_193607.jpg 

On to the next one.  I wonder what it will be?  [wink]



__________________
[GMh06IOh] 
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.