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Thatmas

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Reply with quote  #61 
TedUSA: Wow! Nice selection of scribing tools! I have managed to scribe only with this Bare metal tool and some sewing pins to this point. Although I have only rescribed some lost details and one 1/72 kit before this (along with some added service panels etc).
 
The very last thing to scribe before I continue are the tailplanes. 

[Tailplanes_text-800] 
Tailplanes should have been the first parts because they have very prominent raised panel lines and they give good support for scribe tool. It is very easy to just rescribe along those lines without any additional support. If there would be these kind of panel lines all over the rescribing would have been much easier. Although in that case I might have just sanded them down a little and go with that.. Next I'll have to look all the parts and check that they are evenly scribed and different parts have same amount of details.
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #62 
thanks, I am one of those guys that loves tools and I am actually skilled with a few of them, but scribing? I manage to muck up the most simple straight lines!!! and more than once on the same model. your scribing inspires me and I just need to put in  more time and practice I suppose.
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pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
http://www.pinterest.com/intrstinpintrst/awesome-scale-models/


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Thatmas

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Reply with quote  #63 
TedUSA: I have now noticed that totally re-scribe the whole model is quite good practice and have and this kind of public presentation seems to add some pressure to have it really finished, I hope.
 
After looking at the fuselage and wings together it seemed that there could be more detail on wings. 

[Wings_scribed-800] 
I added some fillercaps and some detail to the wing so that it would seem that fuselage and wing had similar details.
 
I was quite happy to my scribing and I have now looked at the book cover enough that I decided to order decals to this F.3 Lightning (old). The 56 squadrons red/white checkerboard tail. I just couldn't help myself, those colorful Lightnings are just so nice even if it means that I can't hide the surface detail issues when they appear in natural metal finish. I also ordered new pitot tube as the one that comes with the model is quite horrible and the pitot in Lightning is quite prominent. Now I have spent more on these details for old horrible kit than the kit itself.. 
 
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RossiM1

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Reply with quote  #64 
This looking like an epic build and all that hard work on the old kit is looking like it will make the world of difference and a massive improvement your patience and skill is being justifiably rewarded
Gary

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RossiM1
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #65 
I agree with Gary. you are making a silk purse out of a sows ear! the decals sound top notch. I was reading recently about modelers who have actually began searching out older, cheaper kits so that they can afford to pick and choose the AM parts they want as well as some scratchbuilding. The comment was made about some new kits having over 700 parts and how tedious that was--not to mention expensive!
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pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
http://www.pinterest.com/intrstinpintrst/awesome-scale-models/


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Thatmas

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Reply with quote  #66 
Thanks for kind words!
 
RossiM1: Yep, this seems to be epic at least in length...[wink] Although progress in this is much faster than my normal to get something ready before this group build ends.
 
TedUSA: Good point! That you can spend more for aftermarket stuff when you buy older/cheaper kit, perhaps worth consideration. My goal is just to save these old models from my stash to ready as they are much nicer done than in box from where they most likely goes to bin if I don't build them. At least I get some fun out of them. Old kits are nice because I don't have to pity them as I try something new, and scratchbuilding resuls seems to be better than the detail was before because there was no detail at all. If you do scratchbuilding into newer model that already have detail you have to make those convergent and to detail that already exist and fear that you just destroy nice detail that would have been enough.  After stated all this in real life I think _really_carefully_ nowadays to purchase old model if there is newer available. But in my stash there are still few of these older (and very old) kits.

[Exhaust_comparison_text-800]
The exhaust in BAC Lightning (old) is quite simple in detail, but shape seems to be otherwise similar to EE Lightning (new), and quite right. The worst thing is that there is no exhaust at all and you can just see from one to another. Exhaust is blocked from fuselage end though to block see through, but I rather would have it not blanked as I intended to add some length to it. 

[Exhaust_start-800] 
I checked various items from my storage to find the right inner diameter, but I finally find an old coppin (?) that had suitable diameter. I cut it half and took the end parts away. Those exhaust became a little shallow compared to the one from new mold, but I think that the effect is good enough for me. You have to use super glue to glue these new parts to the model because that is not styrene plastic.

[Exhaust_gun_metal-800] 
After I had glued those in place some MrSurfacer is used to hide the seam. Finally I painted it with Tamiya Gun Metal.
 
I thought that the scribing would have been the most time taking thing in this building stage, but as this model has so few components that the scratch building also takes its time. Hopefully there is enough time to get this model ready in time.
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #67 
what a great job using that found item for the engine duct! I also like where you show the new and old kit...very interesting indeed. On the MiG [online--bought two identical kits for $13US!!]and the F-16 I [bought it on consignment at the hobby shop for $15US] have spent a lot of time with inherent kit problems and trying to scratch build my way out of those two oldies. I plan to build both of those planes again but from newer, more accurate and detailed kits that fit well and provide a little more enjoyment rather than a daily fight. Best wishes as you move forward!
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Ted

pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
http://www.pinterest.com/intrstinpintrst/awesome-scale-models/


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Thatmas

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Reply with quote  #68 
TedUSA: It is fun to build two different molds from same aircraft especially now when those are from same manufacturer. The 50 years difference between these molds is shown quite well, I think. It's nice to do the new kit and old kit at same time as you said it is quite a fight to do these older kits, and doing the new kit is very relaxing. But you get perhaps more satisfaction when you get older ready than newer one. My other option (in stead of current Lightnings buils) to build was FJ-4B pair HobbyBoss vs. Matchbox , as HobbyBoss version was quite a bargain 7€ (I payed about half the price from HobbyBoss than from Matchbox version back then). In fact it was my primary option, but this new Lightning was so nice looking and I saw this group build I went with Lightnings. I have found that building similar (newer) models two at the time is boring and it feels like job, when you do same thing over and over again. This was nice experimentation instead. Price for your MiGs was remarkably low! But you'd had to do quite much work for it (and it payed off) when you are planning to do the other one?

[Exhaust_drilling-800] 
I drilled one big hole and to the other exhaust and chain drilling to other. I drilled few holes and cut the remaining piece off.

[Exhaust_parts-800] 
After some serious sanding (I had to use my Dremel) the fuselage was ready to accept the extended exhaust. It would have been easier to just saw the after part away, but this way it perhaps goes more easily to right place and gives more positive fixation to the fuselage/exhaust joint. 
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #69 
After I built the MiG29A and had so many fit problems with it [and the cockpit was a goose egg--nothing at all], I ran across a review of the much more recent and accurate Great Wall Hobbies MiG29A. I have not bought the kit yet but it is on my must have list. when? only god knows, I've got a long must have list!!
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Ted

pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
http://www.pinterest.com/intrstinpintrst/awesome-scale-models/


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Thatmas

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Reply with quote  #70 
[Exhaust_back_wall-800] 
I also cut some styrene for exhaust end to prevent seethrough and base for afterburner ring. I draw around exhaust with marker pen so that I could know where the center of the exhausts are.

[Exhaust_rings_text-800]    
The afterburner ring is made one of my favorite scratchbuilding material: soldering tin. First I panted the backplate with Tamiya Black so I don't have to paint it anymore as tin is suitable color as itself. After that made some spokes to the bottom and on top of that I made rings. Those are easiest to make by rolling some tin wire around suitable diameter cylinder. As the tin is very soft it is very easy to cut it with hobby knife. Now you have as many rings as you have twisted around cylinder. The downside of the soft material is that it bends very easily out of round shape when you handle it.

[Exhaust_rings_complete-800] 
Then it is easy to glue those on top of spokes. Those doesn't need paint in my opinion, so all I had to do is glue those on the right place with super glue.

I received Srciber R today and I had to test it immediately.

[Scribers_text-800]   
The results were as expected: the old made line that had raised the plastic from sides and therefore must sand and scribe again, the material was not taken away. The new one took chip out of the plastic and the line was much better. It is not perfect but much less sanding and rescribing is needed. I don't dare to think how much time I would have saved with this tool! Perhaps bare metal tool has become dull as I have used it rescribing lost panel lines some time.. and the Scriber R becomes similar when time goes by..?
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Thatmas

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Reply with quote  #71 
The next thing that has to get dealt with is the cockpit area. As you remember there is nothing else in cockpit than some kind of seat and pilot. Those have been dealt with earlier, now it's time to do something that they fit in. I haven't seen cockpit this empty ever before if I remember right.

[Cockpit_measurement-800] 
First thing to do is a base that everything could be built on. I decided that it would be cockpits back wall. First I had to make some measurements. It was done with contour gauge from fuselage half.

[Cockpit_alignment-800] 
Then it was traced to paper and paper was folded and cut to right measurements. After that the shape was drawn to 0.3 mm styrene sheet. I had to measure that the cockpit floor is low enough that the whole pilot fits to the cockpit. I made cockpit floor from thicker styrene and put some support underneath it and I put the floor low enough that the pilot will fit there without adjustment. This has to dry properly before I can build anything on top of that floor.

[Cockpit_sidewalls-800] 
After that I made cockpit sidewalls and support to side consoles. The pilot with ejection seat is held in place it is not glued yet.. 
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Thatmas

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Reply with quote  #72 
The supports weren't too much in square. It warped the back wall the wall was made from very thin styrene so it warped, which is both good and bad thing. Good thing in that was that the upper part stayed in right position and the floor was still in level, but the bad was that underside of the cockpit the wall warped. The cockpit also needs some sidewalls, although almost nothing can be seen, so I don't have to put too much effort to this part, the cockpit will most certainly be closed. 

[Cockpit_side_consoles-800] 
First I made side consoles too short for some odd reason.

[Cockpit_styrene_ready-800] 
Some details are made from styrene. Throttle portion and something also for the right hand side. The  I didn't create slavishly the right layout of cockpit as you just can't see inside too much and the pilot blocks big part of cockpit. Those details should look convincing enough.
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #73 
I really like all the details of how you scratchbuild the various components. Using your own templates to get the accuracy you need. I have a large woodworking countour guide in my tool box [non modeling tools]. it is a row of fine wires held in a frame and when you press it against any surface, it creates a duplicate edge for a template as each wire moves to its respective position along the shape. I know that some contour guides are more like a compass and as you pull a fine point along a shape, a pin or pen on the other end duplicates the shape onto paper or another material.Hope those descriptions make sense? another method is using a french curve to replicate parts of the shape one section at a time. I'd like to ask which kind of tool you used? thanks
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Ted

pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
http://www.pinterest.com/intrstinpintrst/awesome-scale-models/


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Thatmas

Flight Sergeant
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Posts: 322
Reply with quote  #74 
TedUSA: The names of the tools in English can go wrong as I'm not native and as translator didn't give anything useful. But your description with lot of fine wires in frame is the tool. It can be shown in top of this posts first picture
 
[Cocpit_mearuremetn_to_paper-800] 
Here is the tool with my 0.3mm pencil, with curvature of cockpit section. I omitted this picture before, because I thought that it didn't add too much information..
 
[Countor_cauge+scissors_text-800] 
This is another omitted picture where is better view of the tool and my trusty Fiskars scissors along with cut out fuselage insert.

[Cockpit_parts_ready-800] 
Cockpit was painted with Life Color UA0026 Grey (black is Life Color dirty black UA731) and washed with AK Brown blue wash. The cockpit main instrument panel came as decal from Modeldecal decalsheet. The sheet was a small disappointment as the printing wasn't the sharpest one and white parts was a little bit yellowish. At least the decal for instrument panel behaved ok. Stick must be build, but it can wait. I don't glue the pilot into place before I close the fuselage because I know that it fits and I think that the fuselage needs some heavy filling/sanding/scribing.
 
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #75 
Thatmas,
I'm an idiot! I TOTALLY missed realizing that the contour device was IN THE PICTURES ALREADY! same kind  I have. thanks for being nice about my evident blindness!

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Ted

pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
http://www.pinterest.com/intrstinpintrst/awesome-scale-models/


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