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Thatmas

Flight Sergeant
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Reply with quote  #76 
The parts that goes inside are ready to be installed inside of the fuselage. Dryfit showed that everything would fit in. Exhaust section was first glued from styrene parts to fuselage aft section. To secure the scratch built part hold I used some fast epoxy, because the scratch built part wasn't styrene plastic.

[Epoxy-800] 
To mix the epoxy I used some small plastic cups which were left over from some packaging. These are extremely useful as epoxy tends to mess everything up and you just can throw away the cup.

[Fuselage_interiors_ready-800] 
The cockpit section kept sliding down while the fuselage parts were fitted together. Because of that cockpit needed some additional support that it would stand still while I was gluing it. I added styrene strip to the bottom of the cockpit. After that it should have more secure fixation.
 
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #77 
Sturdy from the inside out! great work. thanks for including us in each step. helps me figure out problems I run across in my builds.
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Gr4h4m

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Reply with quote  #78 
So much work in this build its making my head spin,respect for your patience and dedication[thumb]
Gra
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Thatmas

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Reply with quote  #79 
Thanks for comments! When I see that plane advances every day its fun to do. And the moment when fuselage is going together in this Lightning F.3 (old) is coming closer..
 
As the plane is going to be landing gears up position there must me a way to make the plane look like it is flying. As I considered options I could think two: stick to exhausts and stick through fuselage.

[Fuselage_stick-800] 
As the first option would be much easier choice (and the exhausts are glued with epoxy..) I ended with the second solution. Reason for this was: I didn't want the model be at vertical position although it would be suitable for this plane and I don't like bent sticks. I wanted that the plane would be in slight bank in level flight. That meant that I had to drill a hole slightly to angle with center line. Then I measured with intended plastic rod how long counterpart should be. After that I sawed aluminum tube to that length.
 
[Fuselage_tube-800] 
The tube was glued with plastic rod inside so that I could determine the right angle. I used two component epoxy glue again but this time quite a lot just to be on safe side. I think the plastic rod would break before the tube would came off ..

[Fuselage_tube_ready-800] 
Little more epoxy.. After the epoxy was hardened I dryfitted the fuselage parts to see if it fits, some minor grinding was needed, but after that the fuselage parts seemed to fit together.
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #80 
I like the option of placing a rod in the center rather than out the exhaust and bending them. thanks for showing how you have managed the mount.
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Thatmas

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Reply with quote  #81 
TedUSA: This is the first this kind of mount for me, let's see what kind of troubles this leads me into..

[Fuselage_inside_parts-800] Every part that goes inside fuselage. I considered that I could glue the fin after I had done re-scribing the fuselage bottom, but I think that I can do scribing with vertical stabilizer attached.

[Fuselage_aft_clamps-800] 
Again I glued this in stages as with F.2A: First the after part of fuselage (I put some epoxy to the end of tube that was inside), the vertical stabilizer is still without glue.. Quite much clamping is needed, but they won't get too much grip from curved polished fuselage.

[Fuselage_for_clamps_text-800] 
Second stage was the front fuselage. And to my horror there was protrusion on the fuselage in place where the aluminum tube is. Fortunately, it was only made with clamps and the tube wasn't really bulging fuselage, but there still is some mark that must be dealt with.
 
There won't be any progress for few days as I'm out of town. Not very good thing for this project as timetable is quite tight for me with this group build. And the progress has been quite slow anyway.
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #82 
Thanks for more pictures and I hope you can get the work done that is needed for the group build timeline.

I had bought some clamps and they had small teeth but did not hold well. I used hot glue and two sheets of very fine sandpaper. I placed the sheets of sandpaper grit side together, hit the clamp jaws with a spot of hot glue, then clamped them on the sandpaper. When all the clamps were cooled and the hot glue set. I just took a pair of scissors and trimmed around each jaw. It did not solve every problem but it helps a lot!

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Thatmas

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Reply with quote  #83 
[Fin_glue-800] 
Last thing to glue was vertical stabilizer. It wasn't in 90 degrees to fuselage and some tape and clamping was needed.

[Fin_gap-800] 
Some gap is seen between fuselage and fin.

[Fin_filling-800] 
I used some tape to fuselage and fin to prevent any putty to wrong places. I used Tamiya liquid surfacer primer putty.

[Fin_q-tip-800] 
Cotton swab was used to smoothen and remove excess putty from seam.
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #84 
Great demo of how to fill the seam and minimize "damage" to surrounding detail. nice work and pictures.
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Thatmas

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Reply with quote  #85 
TedUSA: Thanks, if there is something that I have learned in filling is that you really have to protect areas where you don't want the putty. There is so much work in sanding/scribing polishing and other things to do in removing putty from parts that putty doesn't belong into. And simple tape could have protected and prevented it all.


[Exhaust_gap-800] 
Another way to fill seam is used in fuselage/exhaust gap. I think this is the best way to fill the gap in places where it is easy to sand and you have to scribe is styrene. That is because the filling material is styrene as the whole model and scribing that is fairly easy.

[Exhaust_correction-800] 
First you just put some styrene strips to the gap and glue with Tamiya extra thin glue. After it has dried you just have to cut/sand it down.

[Exahust_sanded-800] 
Scribing the exhaust section was the most difficult part so far as there is curvatures to many directions, but I managed to do that anyway after quite much fight.
 
Yet another way to fill gaps was used in fuselage spine where was quite nice gap:
[Stabilator_gap-800] 
Superglue with baking soda is easy way to fill gaps that have to be smooth and filling has to happen fast. You have to use liquid glue so that it baking soda is mixed with it. First some super glue is put into seam then baking soda is poured on top and some tapping (not with finger) done.

[Stabilator_fixed-800] 
After that excess powder can be removed and then after little waiting it can be sanded down. You have to wait a little while to super glue to harden so that your sandpaper doesn't choke but not too much as the superglue hardens too much and it will be harder to sand.
 
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #86 
good pointers on the seam filling. At the scale model club meeting last night the demo was seam filling. They had a discussion about CA glue and baking soda. They could not decide which went in first--glue or baking soda. your instruction makes sense. the comment about sanding before the CA gets too hard was a point of discussion also. the demo guy stated that if you wait too long the CA is harder than the plastic and when you sand, the styrene gets sanded down and the CA+baking soda is sticking up like a small ridge??? anyway, thanks for the instruction and pictures on your work. helps a lot!
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pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
http://www.pinterest.com/intrstinpintrst/awesome-scale-models/


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Thatmas

Flight Sergeant
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Posts: 322
Reply with quote  #87 
TedUSA: Superglue really gets hard by time, and it becomes much harder than styrene but with right sanding technique it can be sanded smooth with no ridges. I rather wait little too long than choke my file.

Perhaps due to the tube inside the fuselage fuel tank in belly had significant step into it or perhaps I just didn't pay attention into that while gluing. Anyway I have to do something about that. I considered to add some styrene laminating, but as there is some curvature I decided to use baking soda / super glue again.

[Fuel_tank_soda-800] 
Here is the starting point and super glue & baking soda used.

[Fueltank_baking_soda-800] 
Super glue is under and some baking powder is poured on top. Little patting is still needed..

I had to do several layers before I could make it ok. On the side of fin I couldn't use superglue as it is hard to get of from wrong places and I used MrSurfacer 500 to that. This required great amount of work that I could perhaps avoided if I had been more careful..

[Fuel_tank_eady-800] 
Ready polished fuel tank. I had to put one layer of pure super glue to the top as it didn't feel smooth enough.
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Thatmas

Flight Sergeant
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Posts: 322
Reply with quote  #88 
Although the fuselage is now together and biggest gaps are filled fuselage needs some super glue treatment to lengthwise joints so that gluing seam would be totally hidden. The new mold Lightning is also missing this treatment, so I have to make double job this time. The EE Lightning F.3 is catching up the EE Lightning F.2A..

[Seam_fixing-800] 
I used my Locktite glue and applicator made from vinebottle cork and cut off sewing needle. You really can't see any progress in pictures on this stage so there isn't more pictures, but the procedure is as follows: 1) I applied super glue with applicator tool 2) waited glue to harden not too much not too little.. 3) sanded the superglue down until no shiny superglue part is showing 4) polished so that everything is shining again.
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Thatmas

Flight Sergeant
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Posts: 322
Reply with quote  #89 
[Front_wheel_well_Start-800] 
The front wheel well is a bit shallow. Luckily I decided to make this model gears up. Again the kit parts are useless as I want doors to be closed.

[Front_wheel_well_filling-800] 
Some styrene is needed to get doors to right height to same level as fuselage. It is glued with Revel needle glue.

[Front_wheel_well_filled-800] 
The wheel bay is measured and styrene from those measurements is cut down and fitted to the opening, glued with liquid glue and sanded.

[Front_wheel_well_ready-800] 
The scribing is done with my new scriber, it makes more fine line than previous, but one time with old after that helps to correct this matter. The other gaps were filled with super glue/baking soda mix (except pitot-tube place which was filled with styrene).
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Thatmas

Flight Sergeant
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Posts: 322
Reply with quote  #90 

Some scribing done to the fuselage underside. It doesn't require too many panel lines fortunately.

[scribing_fuselage_bottom_aft-800] 
Pictures are taken when first scribing and sanding are done as the lines are shown much better in that way.

[scribing_fuselage_bottom_for-800] 
Scribing from superglue areas is about impossible so in those places razor saw is used. At the same time the F.2A is re-scribed from bottom as molding technique softens all the lines that are not directly perpendicular to the mold. This is basic stuff but time consuming and a bit frustrating as you can't really see anything new in model.
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