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Kit'n'Kaboodle

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Over on the Flory forum there's currently a 'Rescue Me' SIG running.  As the name implies, it's anything to do with saving lives, e.g. fire trucks, ambulances, lifeboats etc.  Since I'm almost exclusively a WWII aircraft builder I chose this as my entry, a Special Hobby Heinkel He-59C ‘Red Cross.’  Special Hobby did do a kit in red cross markings, but of course since I wanted one there were none available on eBay, so I will be using the 'Finland markings' kit, but with a set of masks from a fellow Flory member, Wayne Hillman.  Other than that, it will be totally OOB, as there’s not much available on the aftermarket scene.

  m_20190513_185219.jpg 

Here’s the actual colour call-out from the Special Hobby kit, found on the internet, so this is how it should hopefully look.

  m_010029.jpg 

I think the last bi-plane I built was the old Frog Blackburn Shark, and I must have been about, oh, twelve years old, and I remember what a fiddle all the struts were, so this will be a bit of a challenge!

Here’s the instructions, looking a bit like reduced size photocopies.

  m_20190513_185332.jpg  m_20190513_185350.jpg  m_20190513_185409.jpg 

 

There’s quite a sizeable bag of resin goodies, for a 1/72 kit.

  m_20190513_185439.jpg  m_20190519_193435.jpg 

 

Cockpit interior, and two different nose gun placement interiors.  The kit has two different versions of the He-59, and you have to cut the nose off and fit the new parts depending on which variant you’re building.  Fortunately, for my choice, I can keep the fuselage sections just as they are moulded.

  m_20190519_193451.jpg 

Seats come with teeny harnesses and buckles moulded in.  That’ll be fun to paint!

  m_20190519_193504.jpg 

Mg-17’s and magazines, which, as an air-sea rescue craft, I have to ignore.  This will not come easy to me, as I am certain I have never built a plane with no guns whatsoever.  In fact, I usually like to go for whichever kit option has the most guns!  Oh well, they can go in the spare parts bin.

  m_20190519_193533.jpg 

Engine radiators.

  m_20190519_193606.jpg 

The runner shots.  Not too many parts, though most of them seem to be struts.

  m_20190513_185502.jpg  m_20190513_185521.jpg  m_20190513_185636.jpg  m_20190513_185640.jpg 

Now this I did not expect.  Vac-formed canopies and transparencies.  This will be entirely new to me, as I have no experience whatsoever in vac-forms.

  m_20190513_185716.jpg 

At least there’s two of everything, to allow for the inevitable mistakes! 

So, the build fun begins…



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ddoc666

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Reply with quote  #2 
Subscribed! Will follow with much interest!
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Reply with quote  #3 
Saw you at Flory forum! :) Nice subject for GB. I was always wandering how good is Special Hobby kits. Never build one. I can’t say that I was a fan of Sword’s kit I’ve build for this GB. Let’s see how this turns out! :) I like seaplanes. This one looks cool.
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Kit'n'Kaboodle

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Reply with quote  #4 
It's a typical short-run kit, really, with the usual highs and lows.  No locating pins on any of the parts, making matching up halves a bit of a challenge, but the surface detail is really nice, capturing the fabric of the wings and fuselage well.  And the resin cockpit parts in particular are worthy of mention, as they should really make that part of the kit pop.
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Kit'n'Kaboodle

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First things first, I studied the kit, the instructions and the parts.  Though I’ve not built one before, I know short-run kits can sometimes throw up problems, and as a famous general once said, ‘time spent on reconnaissance is seldom wasted.’  First thing I spotted was that the struts have next to no positive physical location sockets, just some very faint marks on the wings and fuselage.

m_20190519_200216.jpg  

So faint they barely show up in the pics.  I’ll probably drill the struts out, and use some brass rod or something to help locate and strengthen them.

Next potential pitfall is how the wings, or the lower ones at least, attach to the fuselage.  At first glace this looked like it would sit inside the wings, when they are assembled, but it quickly turned out that the wings just simply butt-join to these aerofoil-shaped raised markings. 


m_20190522_192841.jpg 

This didn’t strike me as anywhere near sufficient.  That join needs to be capable of taking a great deal of strain.  There’s the weight of the engines and the upper wing from above, plus the floats from below, and all of the weight of the kit will be transferred onto that join when it’s settled on the ground.

So I decided some form of spanning spar would be needed, but first I needed to attach the wings together. 

As you can see, I have a good selection of variously coloured clothes-pegs to assist!

m_20190522_195514.jpg  

A good deal of care was needed here, as there are no locating pins to guide them into the correct position.  Having said that, they do line up pretty well, though some filler and clean-up will be needed.

m_20190519_200243.jpg  m_20190519_200255.jpg  

There were some peculiar lumps/pin marks that needed to be removed from the upper wings before they would fully close together.

  m_20190522_193123.jpg  

m_20190522_192936.jpg  

Once the wings were together I moved on to the fuselage.  I spotted what looks like a footplate in one side of the fuselage, obviously for the use of the crew to gain access to the rear somehow.

m_20190522_201201.jpg  

I couldn’t resist using a micro-drill to open it up!

m_20190522_201855.jpg  

I found a strange moulding flaw on one half, running fore and aft from the wing socket.  Some gentle sanding made it go away.

m_20190524_191737.jpg  

Some more strange lumps on the inside of the upper fin.  More sanding.

m_20190524_192359.jpg  

Since there’s no pins, to assist in locating the two halves more precisely, I cut some small strips of plastic card and TET’ed them into place.

m_20190525_103624.jpg  m_20190525_104121.jpg  

Now came the scary part:  constructing some sort of wing spar.

Before starting, though, to keep everything aligned, I temporarily glued the two halves together with Micro-crystal clear PVA glue.

Using a panel line as a reference point, I marked down and onto the wing.  From there I knew how thick to make the spar by measuring the depth of the wing’s inside dimension.

  m_20190525_105321.jpg  m_20190525_105434.jpg  
m_20190522_192916.jpg  

I then cut some strips of plastic card that fit the inside of the wing.

m_20190525_182500.jpg  

Glued together they resemble a section of the Forth bridge, but the aesthetics aren’t important.  What matters is that they are as strong as the aforementioned bridge.

  m_20190525_183005.jpg 

I then very carefully drilled and cut two holes in the wing mounting pads to match the exact dimensions of the spar.  Luck was with me this afternoon, and the fit was perfect, being tight enough that glue is almost not needed.

m_20190525_201022.jpg  m_20190525_201043.jpg  m_20190525_201049.jpg  

A quick dry fit shows a near enough spot-on fit for the wings.  They’ll need a little filler, but then so have most builds I have done.

  m_20190525_201116.jpg 

Next I’ll be taking the fuselage apart again, and doing the interior work.

 
 
 

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ddoc666

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Reply with quote  #6 
Look like a demanding kit, but it seems like you have everything under control!!
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Time to break out the paints, and Vallejo suggest two different colours for early Luftwaffe interiors, RLM02 grey and RLM66 black grey.  Since any details are going to be hard enough to see in that teeny cockpit as it is, I elected to go with the lighter colour, RLM02.

m_20190526_134714.jpg  

From the left, front gunner’s position, rear gunner’s place, pilot’s office, various seats and instrument panel.

m_20190526_164847.jpg  

Cockpit details are picked out in various Citadel colours, with some aluminium dry brushing and some Flory dark wash.  Seats are painted the same shade of grey, with some aluminium scrapes on the frames.  Seat pads are Citadel brown, with the harnesses picked out in Tamiya deck tan and the buckles in Mr metal steel.

m_20190526_164854.jpg  m_20190526_164907.jpg  m_20190526_164913.jpg  

Resin cockpit components assembled.  Seat and instrument panel, along with the control column.  Don’t you just lurve 1/72 cockpits?!

m_20190526_195245.jpg  m_20190526_195254.jpg  m_20190526_195303.jpg  

Dry fitting showed the cockpit was fine, but the nose compartment needed some minor sanding before the fuselage halves would close properly.

Last look before buttoning it all up.

m_20190526_202228.jpg  

And, as we all know, once it’s all joined up, there’s not much left to see.  But, we know it’s there!

m_20190526_215447.jpg  
m_20190526_215458.jpg  m_20190526_215505.jpg  m_20190526_215517.jpg  m_20190526_215526.jpg  

Tomorrow will see some filling and sanding, not just of the fuselage, but the wings, too.


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Reply with quote  #8 
Came across some interesting facts while researching for the build.  During WWII the British government ordered the RAF to shoot down any He-59's they came across, regardless of if they were involved in rescue work.  There was a concern that the He-59 would use it's long range radio to report allied shipping movements and positions in the channel.  Naturally the Germans complained bitterly through diplomatic channels, claiming that under the rules of the Geneva convention, any vessel engaged in mercy work and clearly marked with the red cross was to be afforded protection, and was not to be fired upon.
Churchill himself stepped in, and said that, at the time the convention was originally drafted, in the 1850's, air-sea rescue planes could not have been envisaged, and were therefore not covered, and besides, why should he allow pilots to be rescued, just so they could come right back and bomb our cities again?
I can sort of see his point, but still, it does go against our British sense of fair play a bit.  I mean, shooting down unarmed rescue craft?  It's just not cricket old chap!

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Been a while since my last update.  Apart from having to drop back onto and finish the dragster, work has changed my work shift, to 12.00 noon to 8.00pm, messing up my whole routine, and meaning I can only do a little modelling at a time.  I thought I’d wait till I had at least got a little bit done worth showing, so here’s the latest.

Though I neglected to take photos, the wings have been filled, guided-coated, and any gaps reworked, and now look reasonably presentable.  Assembly of the floats and engine nacelles came next.  In both cases I didn’t bother gluing little tabs to help in location, which in hindsight was a mistake.  I would suggest this is done on whatever kit anyone is working on that doesn’t have locating pins and sockets.  The nacelle halves lined up okay, but the fit was off at the front, meaning some remedial filler work will be needed.

m_20190609_093615.jpg  

The floats, however, despite great care being taken to line them up, ended up with a misalignment step.  My fault, not the kits, for not adding the aforementioned tabs!  I had a lot of filing and sanding to do, which as you can see on the one I have started, destroyed the surface detail, particularly the strakes and the access panels.

m_20190609_093650.jpg  

However, that detail is a bit bland, and I have some ideas for pepping that up, more of which later.

There was also a gap at the front of the floats, and this I can blame on the kit.  Nothing major, however, and I’ve had similar gaps on other, high-end manufacturers kits.

m_20190609_093656.jpg  

One float is now fully de-stepped!

m_20190609_095608.jpg  

After several coats of Mr Surfacer and some sanding, I re-scribed all the panel lines.  Also, since on the real subject the floats are made of metal, I added some rivet detail.

m_20190613_092849.jpg  

Similar work was carried out on the nacelles, which were also metal on the real thing.

m_20190614_090927.jpg  

I’ll be returning to the floats next, and doing a bit of scratch-building.


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alainvandenbosch

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Reply with quote  #10 
Oh... do not know why but I just discover your topic at the moment. Whow.. this is not an easy one !!! You havd all my respect ... don't if I would have such your patience with making it all fit together... you are doing a great work.. very inspiring !!!
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Kit'n'Kaboodle

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Reply with quote  #11 
Thanks, Alain!
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valveampman

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Reply with quote  #12 
Look like an interesting project.
 
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Kit'n'Kaboodle

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So, to the floats, and replacing the detail lost in the filling and sanding.  The kit had some raised sections, I think they’re called strakes?  And some rather bland circular panels, but while gathering some reference shots before starting the build I came across this shot.

  i2143_1.jpg 

Aside from being a stunning diorama, I saw he had done a much better job on detailing the floats, and particularly those panels, than the kit provides.  Not sure what purpose the serve, but I do know there were fuel tanks in the floats, so maybe they’re related to them in some way.  I can’t find any actual shots of the real subject to confirm his details, but he may well have a reference book that I don’t, and besides, they look way better than the kit, so I decided to emulate his work.  Also, I had already decided to scratch-build the ropes that hang from the sides of the floats, but I like the little added detail of a coil of rope around the struts.  I’ll probably do something similar to that myself. 

I also found this shot on-line.  

42.jpg  

I don’t know if it’s the same chap, but it does give a good indication of layout.

So, starting with those strakes I fabricated them out of some Slater’s rod, concentrating on getting them parallel. 


m_20190617_091218.jpg  m_20190617_091233.jpg  m_20190617_092907.jpg 

Next those access panels.  I reasoned it would be easier to drill the centre holes first, then cut around them to make the panel, rather than trying to drill into little bits of plastic that would likely spin around in my fingers.  However, the drill just ripped and tore through the thin plastic sheet.

m_20190618_121312.jpg  

Time for a rethink.  So I picked up a round file, and gradually poked it through the sheet, turning it as I did so.  This gave much better results.

m_20190618_121442.jpg  

I then made a pattern part first, out of much thicker sheet, in order to at least try to make them all symmetrical, by drawing around it.

m_20190618_133437.jpg  

But they still came out looking a bit egg-shaped!

m_20190618_140432.jpg  

Still, it’s all 172 scale, and there’s a whole heap of struts to go above them, so hopefully, under a coat of paint and some weathering they won’t look to bad.

The smaller, circular panels presented me with more of a problem, as there was no way I could ever cut a round patch exactly.  That’s when I had the idea of buying a hole punch.

m_20190625_082047.jpg  

If I’d thought of this earlier it would have made making the bigger panels a lot quicker and easier.

This is the result of all that scratch-building.  Not nearly as clean a job as that other chaps, but my skills are not up to his yet, so I’m happy to live with it.

m_20190625_091250.jpg  

To finish off the floats I made some cleats?  Again I’m not sure of the proper term, but I made them out of some 0.3mm brass rod.

m_20190625_092458.jpg  

I made several more than this, for which the carpet monster was very grateful!

Attached with c.a. glue.

m_20190625_094216.jpg  m_20190625_094228.jpg  

With the floats finished I turned my attention to the engine nacelles, and attached the kit supplied resin and p.e. parts.

m_20190622_193303.jpg  

Now waiting for some replacement tungsten micro-drills, so I can drill the attachment holes for the struts.


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valveampman

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Reply with quote  #14 

Nothing wrong in that, practice, practice, and practice some more. we all learn something new from every kit we build. I do and I've been doing this hobby for more years then would like to recall.



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ddoc666

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Reply with quote  #15 
Great detailing, will look fantastic with some paint and weathering!
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