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Kit'n'Kaboodle

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Reply with quote  #1 
Now I have finally finished my Flory Models 'Rescue Me' SIG entry, my Heinkel 59, I can now crack on with this kit for this group build, which is also my entry into the Flory Models 'Beaches to the Bulge' group build.  I know I already started a previous thread on here, with a RAF Mustang Mk.1a, but as I hinted elsewhere earlier, I changed my mind, and wanted to do this one first instead! 

m_20190720_145849.jpg  

Some of you may know by now I like to be a bit different whenever I can, and I figured not too may people would have even heard of the Albermarle, despite the role it played in the Normandy landings and beyond.  Looking not a lot unlike a B-25 Mitchell, it was originally built as a medium bomber, constructed mostly out of wood and other non-strategic materials,  Performance, however, was deemed inadequate, and after only a handful were delivered as bombers, it was then relegated to the transport, para-dropping and glider tug duties.  It first saw service in these roles during the allied invasion of Sicily, in 1943, but it's chief claim to fame was over Normandy, dropping some of the first British paratroops on the night of the 5/6th and towing gliders.


The runner shots.  This is a typical short-run, limited edition kit, bereft of the usual locating pins and sockets.  


m_20190729_214243.jpg  m_20190729_214304.jpg  m_20190729_214338.jpg  
Plastic is rather soft and flexible, not the 'Chinky' sort that Phil Flory is so fond of!

m_20190729_214457.jpg  
Kit comes with a bag of resin parts, mostly for the cockpit area, and a small p.e. fret.  Decals look good, and I'm not anticipating any problems with them.

m_20190729_214708.jpg   

Instructions are typical cottage industry style, on cheapish paper, folded in half, but are reasonably clear and seem easy to follow.

m_20190729_214936.jpg  m_20190729_214945.jpg  m_20190729_214953.jpg  m_20190729_215009.jpg  
I don't think I need to point out which scheme I'll be doing!

m_20190729_215100.jpg  
The only aftermarket products used will be a set of canopy masks.

m_20190729_215114.jpg  
Finally, here's a shot of the actual subject of the model itself, just prior to D-Day.  Of note is the rather crude edges to the invasion stripes.
Feb-15-7a.jpg

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valveampman

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Reply with quote  #2 

Looks good at first sight, but I'm not up and personal with it. you might, in spite of the resin cockpit, have to add some lead shot in the nose to stop it being a tail sitter.  Good luck with the build.  As for me, I'm still waiting for the missing parts to come, (4 Sprues).

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Kit'n'Kaboodle

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks, Colin.  The kit instructions makes mention of 120 gm, which is quite hefty.  Normally I use steel ball bearings, but I don't think they'll cut the mustard for this, so I have ordered some lead sheet of eBay, which I'll cut into strips and cram it in wherever I can.
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Reply with quote  #4 
These aftermarket conopy masks will be very useful. Can't wait to see the building of this nice kit.
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Right, the decks are cleared, all traces of the previous kit are gone, and all my reference shots are pinned up on my artist’s easel.  The lower right picture is the kits own colour chart.  I usually like to pin the instructions on the board too, but in this case they’re a couple of pages of loose-leaf, so it isn’t possible.

m_20190831_154659.jpg  

Because we’re talking about a short-run kit here, it’s best to give all the runners a nice, soapy bath first, to remove any residual release agent.

m_20190831_160127.jpg  

Then leave to dry on a warm towel while having dinner!

m_20190831_161634.jpg  

The kit itself does suffer from a bit of flash, as is often the nature with short run kits.  No biggie, but the small fuselage windows needed a bit of loving attention.  Sorry, forgot to take a ‘before’ shot.

m_20190831_192442.jpg  m_20190831_192504.jpg  

In order to make joining the fuselage halves together easier and more precise, I cut some tabs from plastic card and attached them in several places.  I did the same thing with my He-59, and it worked a treat.

m_20190831_193658.jpg  

Next the cockpit area, and the first little thing was the pilot’s seat.  This came in two parts, and was difficult to hold while gluing, since I only have two working hands.  So I devised a way of holding the two parts in the required position, angle and distance with two pairs of reverse action tweezers.

m_20190831_195029.jpg  
m_20190831_195509.jpg  m_20190831_195516.jpg  

The next problem was a bit harder.  Below are all the interior parts for the cockpit assembly, but there is practically nothing inside the fuselage to show where they go.  There’s a couple of faint lines in the starboard side, and bugger all on the port side.  This is all very reminiscent of the Heinkel, and those struts!  Still, I don’t think it will be a major headache, as long as I do plenty of dry fitting first.

m_20190831_201220.jpg  

The two sections of cockpit floor, the flight deck and the bomb-aimer's position, come together, using the best guess principle.

m_20190901_085712.jpg  

I did say, in the introduction, that the instructions looked reasonably easy to follow.  In the cold light of day, however, on actual usage, they're actually pretty vague, with the parts just floating in space, with little indication on where some of them go.

m_20190901_085725.jpg  

It isn’t much clearer on where the completed assembly goes, either.  Not really a problem, more of an irritation.

m_20190901_085740.jpg  

Rear bulkhead in place.  Notice it runs clean through the middle of one of my locating tabs!  Can’t blame the kit for that, that’s my own boo-boo!

m_20190901_090652.jpg  

All the bits and bobs ready for a coat of Vallejo interior green.

m_20190901_094235.jpg  

The kit’s own p.e. harnesses, at 1/72, were a bit fiddely, but once painted with Tamiya deck tan, and the buckles picked out in aluminium, they actually look rather nice.  The seat cushions are Citadel brown, and the pilot’s cushion is actually a tiny blob of white-tac, as the seat itself had a big empty hollow there.

m_20190902_203112.jpg  

The cockpit parts now painted and assembled.  The instrument panel was p.e. with the dials picked out in Micro crystal clear, to give a glassy effect.  There was also a p.e. throttle quadrant and throttle levers, but I struggle with those even in 1/48, so in 1/72 I stood no chance, so I left them off!

m_20190902_205828.jpg  

Various little switches were picked out in Citadel red and white, some aluminium dry-brushing gave a bit of a scuffed and worn look, and some Flory grime wash highlighted the edges and panel frames.

m_20190902_205841.jpg  m_20190902_205903.jpg  m_20190902_205920.jpg  

That part down at the side of the seat, I have no clear idea what it is, but it may be a set of trim wheels?  I had to make a guess as to where exactly it goes, because, again, the instructions gave no idea where it, part no 63, actually goes.

m_20190902_205945.jpg  

m_20190902_205955.jpg  

The instructions call for the instrument panel to be attached to the floor at this stage, but I’m going to leave it out until the floor is in place in the fuselage.  That way, if it needs trimming, it will be a lot easier than if it’s already stuck to the floor.

It seems that, as with the Heinkel before, my desire to try to be a bit different has lead me astray again, and into another challenging build.  However, I am enjoying the challenge, and this build, and at least there's no bloody struts to worry about!


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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alainvandenbosch
These aftermarket conopy masks will be very useful. Can't wait to see the building of this nice kit.


There you go, Alain!

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remy

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thats already some nice progress on this entry! Great job!
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Kit'n'Kaboodle

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Reply with quote  #8 
Cheers, Remy!
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #9 
you charged out of the gate at full gallop!! nice work!
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pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
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Reply with quote  #10 
Thanks, Ted!
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Before attaching the cockpit assembly, I needed to add some weight at the front, according to the instructions no less than 120 grams. 


m_20190905_060415.jpg 

That struck me as a heck of a lot for such a small kit, but rather than risk a tail-sitter I decided to do as they suggest. On my Renzan build I used some steel ball bearings, but for this there was no way I could get that amount of weight in the limited space.  I needed something more dense, so I orders a 1-foot square section of lead sheet of eBay.

20190904_123851.jpg 

After measuring the width of the fuselage at the point behind the cockpit I cut the lead into strips.  Great stuff, lead.  It’s so easy to work with, being almost as malleable as Blu-tac, and you can cut it with ordinary scissors, just don’t use your partners best kitchen ones!

This is what 120 grams of lead looks like.

m_20190905_060422.jpg 

Using my origami black-belt skills, I folded the strips into the best lengths that fitted forward of the centre of gravity, and used my vice to compress the folds.

m_20190906_201512.jpg  m_20190906_202018.jpg 

There was still a lot of lead strip left, and some space to stuff it in, so I worked it around the locating pin and the side window as best I could.

m_20190906_202031.jpg 

I still had a bit of room left, so I cut some more, and super-glued it to the sides.

m_20190906_204145.jpg 

And this is the weight-pack end result, just shy of 100 grams, which in my hand feels pretty damn heavy.  If it turns out to still not be enough I’ll pack some more into the front of the engine nacelles.

m_20190906_204159.jpg  m_20190906_204204.jpg 

Now I could fit the cockpit floor.  There was a bit of a twist in it, so I glued the rear bulkhead in place first, then when it was good and set, I worked forward, a bit at a time.  Turned out just as well I left the instrument panel off, as it did indeed need a little trimming in order to fit snugly.

m_20190907_190827.jpg 

Now the nose wheel bay.  This came as a resin part.  Nicely detailed, but nowhere near a good fit.  In fact, remember that previous instruction picture?  See the file?!  Yup, you have to figure it out yourself.

  m_20190905_060415.jpg 

 It took a lot of fettling and dry fitting before it settled into place.

m_20190907_191208.jpg 

The weight pack was then painted black, so it couldn’t be seen through the canopy, and then secured firmly into place with copious amounts of c.a. glue.

m_20190907_192041.jpg 

Now I could button up the fuselage, which, as you can see, had a bit of warpage going on.

m_20190907_191528.jpg 

It took a fair few clamps to close everything up, resulting in some sort of sci-fi walking machine!  I used a mix of TET and c.a. in places, then left everything to set overnight.

m_20190907_194626.jpg 

Next day I repeated the process with the underneath.

m_20190909_191129.jpg 

While that was setting I moved on to the wings, and the undercarriage bay floors.  Again, the kit parts were nicely detailed, but didn’t quite want to fit, but nothing a few handy paint jars and aerosol cans could sort out.

m_20190909_191138.jpg  m_20190909_191142.jpg 

Fixed.  Just needs a bit of grim wash now.

m_20190909_191219.jpg 

Clamps removed, but the extreme end of the tail had popped.

m_20190909_191756.jpg 

Another dab of c.a. sorted it.  Unfortunately, the fuselage seam, though gap free, is anything but even.  Each side seems to be taking it in turns to be first higher, then lower than the other, a bit like waves on the sea.  It’s only tenths of mm, but it’s going take a fair bit of filing to get it all flat and level.

  m_20190909_192858.jpg 

So, a good splashing of Mr Surfacer 500, and I’ll be back at it tomorrow.

 
 
 

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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #12 
That is a load of lead but great choice to get the weight you need. Nice work!
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pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
http://www.pinterest.com/intrstinpintrst/awesome-scale-models/


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Kit'n'Kaboodle

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thanks, Ted. [smile]
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Kit'n'Kaboodle

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Reply with quote  #14 

I thought I’d taken more progress shots than I had, but it seems not.  Still, most of this weeks’ time has been filling, sanding, filling, well, you get the picture.  Not very exciting, and not really worthy of photos anyway.  So today, while I was waiting for the last bit of filler to go off I switched my attention to the Bristol Hercules engines.  The kit items were pretty decent, not up to resin standards, but nice enough for a short run kit.  Strangely, the runners for these, and a few other items, were cast in a paler coloured plastic.  Assembly was straightforward.

m_20190914_133801.jpg 

First colour was Mr Metal burnt iron.  I seem to always use this colour for engines, at least radial ones, but it does seem to suit. 

Then I had to go and be silly.  Anyone who followed my 1/72 Renzan build will remember I had the daft idea to scratch-build the ignition wires.  All 72 of the blighters, only to find that practically none of it was eventually visible on the finished build.

So why the flippety-flip am I doing it again?!  Anyway, this time I started with a 0.3mm drill, and drilled holes in the ignition ring, just forward of the crankcase.  At least this time there's only 28 of them.

m_20190914_170450.jpg 

Since I seem to have a propensity for snapping these bits whenever I use them in any form of power tool, I used the old-fashioned method, and twirled the bit between finger and thumb.  Didn’t snap!

A Google-image search turned up several different paint colours for the front crankcase and other details, so I went with what I have used before, and did the ignition ring in Mr Metal gold and the case itself with Vallejo PRU blue.  A few flecks of Vallejo aluminium to represent a bit of wear finished it off.

m_20190914_192449.jpg 

Then the fun part, making up the leads.  5 amp fuse wire, with the silver coating sanded off to reveal the copper core, then cut to short sections and super-glued home.

m_20190914_204351.jpg 

Like I said, it’ll all disappear later, so why did I bother?  Answers on a postcard to Genesis Models, most original/amusing answer wins a pat on the back!


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alainvandenbosch

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Reply with quote  #15 
A nice couple of engines you have there !!! Very well done !!!
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