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pfc071

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Reply with quote  #1 
Just returning to the hobby after many years and purchased an Iwata airbrush and new compressor.

I notice in videos of builds that different types or brands of paint or other mediums like gloss coats are sprayed at different air pressures.

Is there a resource I can access or a chart to show what pressure to use when spraying.?
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Brundledonk

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Reply with quote  #2 
There isn't a resource, that I have come across for this, the problem is there are so many factors that effect the pressure you need to spray at, different types of paint are only one of them. How thin they are, temperature and humidity have a huge effect also. I use mainly acrylic paints and spray between 12 and 18 psi, depending on if I'm spraying large areas or details, practice is the key, after a while you will be able to feel if the pressure needs to go up or down, I find the key is the right thinning of the paint if it's too thick it will spatter and dry as it hits the surface too thin and it pools up, only advice I can offer is practice, practice, practice

Pete
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pfc071

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Pete, your insight is helpful. So many new products to use but I too mainly use acrylic and will use your suggestions. 

Peter
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #4 
I ruined a kit finish becasue I had too much thinner and I was using the airbrush too far from the kit! the paint was practically hitting the model "dry" and made a horrible rough finish. I have some scrap pieces of sheet styrene that I often use to shoot my paint mix onto to check how my combination of paint/thinner/pressure/distance/flow setting, etc is working. could save you some headaches and heartaches! Ive even thought of buying a cheap kit just to parctice nothing but paint work on. just build up the fuselage and wings--put the rest in the spares box?
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Ted

pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
http://www.pinterest.com/intrstinpintrst/awesome-scale-models/


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seekis

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Reply with quote  #5 
There are so many variables, the best advice I got was to standardise everything and concentrate on adjusting only one thing. So for example stick to say 20psi and vary paint/thinner consistency until you get the kind of atomisation you like. Then you can adjust for distance, temperature, coverage etc
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Brundledonk

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TedUSA
I ruined a kit finish becasue I had too much thinner and I was using the airbrush too far from the kit! the paint was practically hitting the model "dry" and made a horrible rough finish. I have some scrap pieces of sheet styrene that I often use to shoot my paint mix onto to check how my combination of paint/thinner/pressure/distance/flow setting, etc is working. could save you some headaches and heartaches! Ive even thought of buying a cheap kit just to parctice nothing but paint work on. just build up the fuselage and wings--put the rest in the spares box?


The learning curve is very steep to begin with, I had the same problems you describe when I started, once I started to get the consistency right it got much easier, I think that the actual spraying part is the easiest thing to learn, but if the paint is not right nothing you do will help ! I tend to keep my paint very thin these days and do multiple coats, I find I get a lot less problems using a mix like this, also if you get the "sandpaper" finish a nail polisher will normally turn it into a pretty nice finish.
Good advice on using a test mule too, nice way to test out new techniques without worrying about messing up your latest project

Pete
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Brundledonk

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by seekis
There are so many variables, the best advice I got was to standardise everything and concentrate on adjusting only one thing. So for example stick to say 20psi and vary paint/thinner consistency until you get the kind of atomisation you like. Then you can adjust for distance, temperature, coverage etc


This is very good advice, get the paint mix right and it really is half the battle

Pete
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pfc071

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks to everyone for your input. I have been using your suggestions with good results.

Peter
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