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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #1 



I have been asked, by members, if I could pass on some details on how to paint figures to accompany their builds.

I thought long on this idea and have decided that the basics are required by those who wish to use them.
What I will be showing is in by no means THE way to paint figures, it is meant as a guide line only. We each have differing ways to paint and it would take a massive Tomb to detail all techniques.

There may be a lot of text, but I will try to keep it to a minimum, and will throw in a few photographs to break things up a bit.
At any time if you have a question I will try to reply to all of them.

My first problem is what model should I use as an example, that can cover different techniques. ...

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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #2 
I have a personal project that I am working on, and have decided to paint one of the figures.



As you can see, I've posed these already to relate a story, on an old Original Tamiya kit.
The figures are from the Mini Art Set, and as Chieftain's are being produced left right and centre (and about time too) I thought it would be appropriate.



So this is the kit...and the figure I have in mind is the Tank Commander.



I love the expression on his face, as if he either can't believe what he's hearing or, as I want to belive, he's trying to get last night's football results.

err.....he's a Brit after all...

Glued, modified, cleaned and sprayed with some spare Ghost Grey AV Primer (Vallejo ) with thin layers.



Now to leave this for 24hrs......it will be worth it.

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Alba83

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for putting this up mate, im sure myself and others will benefit greatly from it

And yeah war or not got to check in on the Reds score ! 



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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks, are you aware that no Chieftan ever fired a shot in anger. It was enough just to fire up the engine.
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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #5 
Okay, whilst the figure is drying, I'm going to talk about certain "rules" (for want of a word) that you need to know that will help you.

These are not in any particular order, as some are just as equal as others. Brushes and paints I will talk about later on.

To start with NEVER use Black or White as a Base Colour. Sounds silly, but think about it...you can't shade Black and you can't highlight White!
For a dark base colour pick a black/blue mix or a Black/Green mix, or even a Black/Red mix...



In this example I'm able to shade down to Black and highlight to Red, and then highlight the Red.



With White, use a base colour of light grey, this will allow you to highlight to white.

By doing this you are using 3 colours for the area you want to paint. Keep that in mind, plan to paint with 3 colours. Once you become okay with this you will be able to to move on to 4, 5, 9, 11 different colours, but for the moment lets keep it simple....stick to 3/4.

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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #6 
The second most important Rule is to paint in thin layers to build up the colour.

I will talk about this next.




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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thin layers of paint.

Do not try to get the correct colour you want in one coat. It will need to be thick and this will show up brush strokes. Take your time and apply thinned down layers. They will dry quicker and leave a smooth finish.

Thinning paint will depend on the paint you are going to use. If you are using Enamels then use the correct thinner.
Tamiya can be brushed by thinningwith Vallejo Airbrush Cleaner (not the Thinners).
Acrylics, being water based can be thinned with water...but beware..some tap water can give unexpected results, depending if you geographically live in a hard or soft water area.
I always use bottled still water like River Rock (although I don't use Evian..a product that spells Naive backwards is a bit un-nerving).

If, at any stage, you find that paint is drying too quickly on your palette then add a touch of retarder to slow the drying time. Even better if you have a wet palette, which I've only just started using, as this keeps your paint fresh for up to 2 weeks (perfect for blended shades of colour).




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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #8 
Whenever I paint a figure I generally work from the inside and work outwards, much like getting dressed, underwear then trousers (unless your name is Bruce Wayne [wink] ).
There are exceptions to this rule, but here is not the place to go into that for now.

So the first thing we are going to paint, on this model, are the eye balls....the whole eye ball, not just the sliver you will see. (Remember...inside out).



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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #9 
Subscribed! Thanks Nigel. I already see positives and negatives in what I have done with my SIG figures. Mistakes are part of learning of course. By now I should be a master! LOL. But to keep making the same mistakes and expecting different results is the definition of insanity [stupidity?].
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pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
http://www.pinterest.com/intrstinpintrst/awesome-scale-models/


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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #10 
You've raised quite a good point Ted, thanks. Everyone will, at some point, make mistakes and it is true that we learn from them.
When painting figures there are so many techniques employed that even I am still learning. So when does it stop...it doesn't. You can stop at anytime, when you are producing painted figures to a standard that you like and you are comfortable with the technique you use.
Every now and again you try something a little extra....if it works, it works....if it doesn't, don't do it.
The main thing is to keep painting, as often as you can.
Myself, I tend to take breaks from larger projects to just painting figures....then switch back.

How I used to paint a Necron Lord..


With a better understanding of a few techniques this is the result.



The downside is that I now have to repaint my whole army to bring it up to this level [wink]

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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #11 
BRUSHES

The most common comment everyone states, when they see my figures, is "You must have great eyesight and really small brushes".
They couldn't be any further from the truth. My eyesight is, to say the best, crap! Throughout my life I have never seen anything in 3D, everything is flat, even pouring a drink into a glass I have to look down on the top of the glass.
Small brushes...no...these are the brushes I will be using on this paint job...



These are cheap brushes from Bargain Shops or Makeup Stores (the one shot eyeliner brushes are amazing).
So, why do I use these when I have a collection like this...


Eagle-eyed viewers will may have spotted the Windsor and Newton Series 7 klonsky sable brushes.

If a brush has a good sharp tip, and can hold it's shape whilst using, then that's good enough. Most painters will have their favourite brush, the one they use the most and know what it can do, or not do.
The series 7 brushes I use for commission work and my own collection for shows.

Clean your brushes well and they will last for quite a lot longer than you might think.

EDIT : Sorry photographs are in the wrong places, I will correct them if I remember.

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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #12 
Okay, enough talking, time for some painting.

THE FACE

This is without doubt the most important part of the figure. It is the first area a person will look at, it's built into us all as we need to know if the other person is friendly or deadly.
The most important part of the face are the eyes.
This is my way to paint a face, there are other ways...it's a matter of choice...whichever suits you best.

Using off white (in this example I use Game Color Dead White)...paint the whole eyeball.



Now paint the iris...DO NOT USE BLACK !.....use green or brown, or in this example I used blue. You don't have to be tidy, just make sure they don't look cross eyed.



Once dry we are ready to paint the flesh. For this I use Life Color Flesh Set, and I've chosen 3...a shadow..a base..and a highlight.



The reason I use these paints is because they are already thinned.



Now using the Shadow paint the upper and lower eye lids and then the rest of the face.



So far so good...next you will be seeing how how to tidy things up a little.


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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #13 
okay, already learned a lot Nigel. Great stuff.
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Ted

pinterest pg. of scale models/dioramas:
http://www.pinterest.com/intrstinpintrst/awesome-scale-models/


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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #14 
Good to hear you've gained something from this topic, makes it all worthwhile.

Next stage is to dry brush with care the face with the Base colour to show the raised areas that will be highlighted later on.
Apply another thinned layer of the basecoat so as to blend the shadows.



continue to apply a further thin coat to build the basecoat up.



Now allow this to dry completely, ready for the next stage.

Notice how the head looks too big for the rest of the figure, this is an optical illusion, and once the basecoats of the Uniform are applied it will settle down.

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Dangermouse

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Reply with quote  #15 
Now for some shading to blend the coats already applied, and bring some warmth to the skin.



Allow this to completely dry without any pooling...



Time now to paint the neck area, for this I shall be using the following paint and wash.



Next atage to reapply the shade into the shaddows and highlight with pale flesh. I tend to use a very thin highlight and apply it in a dabbing motion. If you apply too much it can be removed with a dry brush whilst it is still wet.



It's now ready to sealed with a gloss varnish to save what has been done so far.

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