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Alba83

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi

I've noticed a lot of you like to add in your own little details to your kits

im wondering what thickness are the Styrene sheet you guys are using ?

Would i be better to just get a selection 

From what i see ModelsRGo Offer the best selection, though it is limited is there somewhere else you guys buy from ?

Also i keep seeing all this brass Pipe and stuff what are you using it for ? 

Cheers

Alba

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Steven
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TedUSA

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Reply with quote  #2 
Welcome! Scratch building can add a lot of detail to model builds. personally I have access to two great hobby shops near where I live. I have no idea what is available to you locally. Evergreen is a company that makes all kinds of styrene raw materials for modelers to use. I bought a sample of different thickness sheets and strip styrene. its really hard to judge it without looking at it in person. If you have to buy it online, take a MM ruler and draw some of the sizes on a sheet of paper to give yourself an idea of the widths, thicknesses. it also depends on the scale of the model you are building as to what thicknesses you would find most useful.
Here is the link to Evergreen to start looking: http://www.evergreenscalemodels.com/
As for brass tubing/pipe? brass is made in sheets and also in turned tubes that can be used to mount a model off a base [aircraft in flight] or as the "barrel" inside a model for a piece of Plexiglas rod to fit into as a support. small brass tubing and small solid brass rods can be used for landing gear strut replacements since it is far stronger than styrene kit struts. if small enough the brass tubing or rod could be used as part of an aircraft's internal "plumbing"--usually however, much cheaper and easier to work with products are available.
You will also see mention of fine wire [copper] used as the wiring in cockpits and landing gear brake lines as well as "fuse wire". both are very easy to cut and shape.
A trip to any kind of store that has the supplies for making your own jewelry is a modelers dream for all kinds of wire and bits of tiny odd items when glued in and painted appear to be part of the detail of an interior of an aircraft. Looking at the WIP threads on the site is very helpful to get ideas for scratchbuilding materials. don't be afraid to message another member with the "where did you get that" question.
Cheers!

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Alba83

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks very much for a great reply Ted, very much appreciated 

Cheers

Steven

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Steven
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Brundledonk

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Reply with quote  #4 
Sorry I missed this post Steven, it's easy to use forget to look this far down the main page.

It's only quite recently that I have started to use scratchbuilding in some of my builds, the sizes 1000th of an inch or whatever don't really register in my addled brain so I tend to choose the thickness by eye according to whatever it is I'm trying to build. I
I keep some lead wire in the stash though, to use for wiring and plumbing in wheel bays etc, and Use 0.2mm, 0.3mm and 0.5mm the most.
The brand I use is plus model and I think I got it from ebay, but you can use fuse wire or solder if it's easier to get hold of. Also you can cannibalise old or broken electronic gear for nice scale wiring.
As Ted mentioned a craft shop is a great source of greeblies for us modellers and for us in the UK, Hobbycraft (while not the cheapest option) has a tone of gear that can be useful for us modellers in the beading section

Pete
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Alba83

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Reply with quote  #5 
No worries Pete Cheers for replying

I got a load of the Plus Model Lead wire in various thickness last week, so i guess il just do the same with the styrene.

I forgot about Hobbycraft to be fair theres one not to far from me il check it out

Thanks again 

Steven

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Steven
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Choppa Nutta

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Reply with quote  #6 
Scratch building stuff is great, something well worth encouraging [wink]
It allows access to so much more choices and options, problem solving
can reach further and it also allows you to explore your own design ideas
from the ground up too, well worth investing the time into it [thumb][thumb] [smile]

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falloffalot

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hey there Steve, I also missed this thread.

I only scratchbuild and would definitely recommend you start with a "starter pack" of styrene sheets.
You should get around 10 x A4 sheets of various thicknesses from 0.25 - 1mm for about £10 GBP from eBay.
I wouldn't pay more than a £1 for a 1mm A4 styrene sheet.
I have found that black is a little softer and desolves / welds easier / faster than the white.
I've also tried a number of adhesives and found the best by far is Poly Cement.

I've recently started using PVC foamboard for jobs thicker than 3mm as 3mm styrene is well expensive.
This also glues great with Poly Cement and sticks the Styrene

Hope this helps?
Jas

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provenance

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hey Steve,

You will find quite a bit of scratch building and techniques in my current build, which I am using to add realistic details to an otherwise bland (but accurately profiled) Nineties kit

I use Slaters Plasticard and Evergreen and both can provide you with a number of great mixed packs to get you started, both sheets and different profiles such as rods, pipes, angles, strips ...

Bear in mind however that styrene plastic reacts differently than your kit plastic with 'hot melt' cements and even Tamiya Extra Thin can prove to be a bit brutal, I continue to use MekPack and this will not mark your plastic nor leave you with a melted mess! Applied very accurately with a very small Sable brush.

Drawn into this area you will also ultimately require a Punch & Die Set (mine is a Waldron) and a number of other forming tools for brass and plastics such as Etch Rollers, bending and ring forming tools (http://www.thesmallshop.com)

Wires, lead & copper wire, lead sheet etch are all available in a huge range from Fly Tying on-line retailers

Enjoy your modelling adventure,
Peter

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Current Build[s] Mirage 2000C 103-LI 'Tigermeet 2010' - Eduard/Heller 1/48th Scale
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cybershed

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Reply with quote  #9 
I used to tie flies, so I know the wire you are talking about. It would be ideal and there are a few colours and guages.

I haven't done much in the way of scratch building at all. But I am interested in doing a model with an engine exposed. And I am very impressed and intrigued by the way some modellers spruce up an out-of-the-box engine with wiring etc to replicate hydraulics, fuel pipes, coolant pipes and the like.

Funnily enough, the fly-tying materials had never struck me before. So, thanks Pete, great tip [smile]

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