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marc2109

Senior Aircraftman
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Posts: 46
Reply with quote  #1 
I worked on the Spitfire along with Bobby's video, put when it came to the fuselage, I still had seams showing. To glue the fuse halves together, I taped them together making sure there were no steps and applied Tamiya extra thin the same as Bobby. I did some light sanding following along with the video. I don't believe there were any gaps, but I could still see the seam lines.  I tried to putty over these to hide them using Mr Liquid Putty ( I didn't have Vallejo or Perfect plastic putty at the time), but after sanding, the seam still showed through.  I finally had to use some super glue (which I think was too thick because I had to sand a lot) to hide the seam.  The sanding of course meant a lot of re-scribing would be needed.

Does anybody else have this much trouble hiding seams?  Again, there weren't any real gaps and there where no steps, I could just see the seam line. 

Another question comes out of that.  I did the black paint test somewhere in that process, and didn't see a seam line in one area.  However, after I sprayed on the Vallejo primer, all of a sudden the seam showed.  Now, I let it dry really good about 48 hours,  but after sanding the area and trying to hide the seam,I repainted the area with the primer and  I had levels. These I could not get rid of.  Should I have removed ALL of the primer from the entire model before repainting?  Did I do it wrong?

Please help me out on this.  Thanks!
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TheNobleWizard

Junior Technician
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Posts: 101
Reply with quote  #2 
Marc
can you post up some pictures? This will help in identifying the problem.
If you made sure that both parts were perfectly level when you joined them, then the problem may be a lack of extra thin. You will notice that Bobby is quite liberal with it. When you have applied it, make sure you have covered the length of the seam. Then, very gently press the parts together so that the softened surfaces are in contact. Apply prolonged pressure using pegs, clamps, tape and bands until dry. Remember that extra thin is not a glue, it is a solvent and it is the melted plastic that forms the weld and fills any gaps.
If you miss a bit when gluing, thinned paint will not fill the gap and you then have to resort to other tactics.
Hope that helps

Regards

Chris
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marc2109

Senior Aircraftman
Registered:
Posts: 46
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Chris for responding.  I thought I was but perhaps not.  If I am reading you right, you are saying that if I still see a seam line after joining using extra thin (assuming of course there are no steps) then I either did not apply enough extra thin, or did not get good contact between the halves after applying. 

Unfortunately, I did not take any pictures. 

That begs a question,  after the parts are joined, and I find a seam line, do I go back and apply more extra thin to the area and apply pressure?  In other words, after I find a seam line once the parts are joined, how do I get rid of it?

Thanks so much!!
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TheNobleWizard

Junior Technician
Registered:
Posts: 101
Reply with quote  #4 
Marc

Yes, after applying the extra thin, you must ensure that the two surfaces to join are in good contact, any gaps will not be filled by the solvent.

Personally I would not reapply extra thin after the first application has dried unless there is an obvious bit that has not bonded and the two surfaces can still be pushed together.
You will need to apply filler now. There are lots of options here, green putty, valejo putty, ca glue and sprue melted in extra thin to name a few. Bobby uses all types in his video builds so would be worth taking a look as the selection differs depending on the size of gap and accessibility for subsequent sanding.
Hope that helps

Regards

Chris
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